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Implementing your DAIP

Here you'll find information, guidelines and initiatives relating to each of the DAIP outcome areas:

Outcome 1
Outcome 2
Outcome 3
Outcome 4
Outcome 5
Outcome 6
Outcome 7

Outcome 1

People with disability have the same opportunities as other people to access the services of, and any event by, a public authority.

Main resources

State Government Access Guidelines for Information, Services and Facilities

Additional resources

You’re Welcome Access WA website

Resources for people who are blind or have vision impairment

VisAbility (formerly The Association for the Blind of WA) offers information, advice and support concerning the provision of access for people who are blind or who have vision impairment. The organisation can be contacted for assistance in presenting a seminar to people with vision impairment, producing written information in alternative formats such as large print, computer disk, audio cassette or Braille, as well as advice on making your website accessible.

Resources for people who are deaf or have hearing impairment

Information about the provision of assistive listening devices is included in access legislation including the Building Code of Australia, Australian Standards and the Disability (Access to Premises-Buildings) Standards 2010.

Australian Sign Language (Auslan) interpreters can be booked through the WA Deaf Society Inc. The Society can also be contacted for information about Telephone Typewriters (TTYs).

Audio loops for hire

Better Hearing Australia provides information and advice about assistive listening devices, has audio loops for hire and distributes Better Hearing Kits that provide information about communicating with people with hearing impairments.

Audio loops for purchase

An audio loop consists of an amplifier and long cable that transmits sound from a public address system directly to the hearing aids of people who are positioned inside the loop cable.

To purchase an audio loop in WA, contact Listening Solutions on 6364 4805 or email sales@waelect.com.au 

Outcome 2

People with disability have the same opportunities as other people to access the buildings and other facilities of a public authority.

Legislative requirements

The rights of people with disability, including access to premises, are recognised by State and Australian legislation. The Australian Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) is of particular relevance. Before the introduction of the DDA, legislative access requirements were contained in the Building Code of Australia (BCA), which sets out the minimum requirements of building design and construction throughout Australia.

DDA Access to Premises Standards

Significant work has been done to better align the BCA and DDA. The result of this work is the DDA Access to Premises Standards (May 2011). The DDA’s Access to Premises Standards outlines minimum access requirements in relation to new and updated buildings.

Guidelines on the Access to Premises Standards

The Australian Human Rights Commission developed Guidelines on the Access to Premises Standards to assist building professionals and those concerned with access to understand better how the Premises Standards apply to new and upgraded public buildings.

State Government Access Guidelines for Information, Services and Facilities

The State Government Access Guidelines for Information, Services and Facilities will assist state government agencies in fulfilling their social and legislative responsibilities by ensuring people with disability can access their services and events. These are referred to in Premier's Circular 2003/08. The guidelines may also be useful to those in local governments.

Builders and Developers Stages for Planning Access

The Commission’s fact sheet Builders and Developers – Stages for Planning Access identifies the different stages during the planning, development and construction phases where access needs to be incorporated into the design brief and processes.

Access advice

Accredited access consultants can assist public authorities and developers in assessing and resolving physical or environmental access issues in relation to the built environment. Services include accessibility appraisals, audits, design and information on standards and good practice. It is particularly recommended that an accredited access consultant is engaged as part of the design team throughout the planning and construction phases of major projects to ensure that access is appropriately addressed. A list of consultants registered with the Association of Consultants in Access, Australia Inc (ACA Australia) can be viewed at the ACA Australia website.

Independent Living Centre of Western Australia (ILC)

The ILC provides information and advice on equipment, assistive technology, fittings, fixtures, furniture, building and design for people with disability, their advocates, carers and service providers.

Liveable Homes

Liveable Homes is a new design guideline developed to make homes easier to use and safer to get around. Developed with the WA housing industry, the guidelines improve the accessibility and adaptability of homes so people can live more comfortably and stay in their homes longer even if their circumstances change, including their ability to move about. The Liveable Homes initiative was developed to increase the number of private and public homes that are built with universal access.

With an ageing population and increasing rates of disability, there is a changing demand and an opportunity for builders to offer housing design solutions that are future-proofed, whether renovating or building a new home. The Liveable Homes guide has been developed to help both consumers and designers meet this changing housing trend. The guide was developed by the State Government with the WA building industry to identify for builders and homeowners the best steps to take to ensure houses are adaptable and multigenerational.

While championed by the Disability Services Commission, liveable homes are for all ages, abilities and mobility. Key features include flat level entries, wide hallways and doorways, strong walls in bathrooms and toilets and good circulation spaces, especially in wet areas. They are open-plan and designed to maximise space in key areas of the home. Liveable homes ensure people of all ages and abilities can live in them or visit with comfort.

Main resources


Additional resources

  • Access advice
  • Advisory Notes on Access to Premises
  • The Building Code of Australia (BCA) sets out the minimum requirements for building design and construction throughout Australia and references various Australian standards and codes to provide technical building requirements. Standards referenced by the BCA have legal application.
  • Building Commission
  • State government agencies have a social and legislative responsibility to ensure their services can be accessed by all of their customers in accordance with Premiers Circular 2003/08.
  • Standards Australia provides information about its services and activities and includes an online service to purchase standards. There are several Australian standards relevant to providing access to buildings and facilities some are listed below. It is important to refer to the latest version of the relevant standard.
  • AS 1428.1 General requirements for access – New building work
  • AS 1428.1 Supplement 1 General requirements for access – buildings-commentary
  • AS 1428.2 Enhanced and additional requirements – buildings and facilities
  • AS 1428.3 Requirements for children and adolescents with physical disabilities
  • AS 1428.4 Tactile ground surface indicators for the orientation of people with vision impairment
  • AS 1735.7 Stairway lifts
  • AS 1735.12 Escalators and moving walks Part 12. Facilities for people with disabilities
  • AS 3769 Automatic teller machines (ATMs)-user access
  • AS 2890.1 Off-street parking: Mandatory requirements
  • AS 2890.5 On-street parking 


Outcome 3

People with disability receive information from a public authority in a format that will enable them to access the information as readily as other people are able to access it.

Accessible information

People with disability may experience difficulty accessing public information. The types of disability that frequently impact on a person's ability to access information include hearing loss or deafness, impaired vision or blindness or disabilities that affect the ability to learn or think, such as intellectual or psychiatric disability.

Many communication difficulties can be avoided with informed planning and procedures such as:

  • using clear and concise language
  • using appropriate font style and size
  • providing information in alternative formats
  • providing audio loops
  • using Auslan sign language interpreters
  • captioning videos
  • designing accessible websites
  • displaying information in an accessible location.


The Commission has prepared resources that explain the impact of disability and how to meet the specific information requirements of people with disability.

Main resources

The Accessible Information Training Package contains information on how to make information accessible. The training package covers the areas of:

PDF versions (also available in Word below)

About disability
Legislation, codes and standards
Accessible information
Accessible information checklist
Accessible websites
Accessible websites checklist
Customer service
Resources
Accessible events checklist
State Government Access Guidelines for Information, Services and Facilities helps state government agencies provide information on services and facilities accessible to people with disability.

Word versions

About disability
Legislation, codes and standards
Accessible information
Accessible information checklist
Accessible websites
Accessible websites checklist
Customer service
Resources
Accessible events checklist
State Government Access Guidelines for Information, Services and Facilities helps state government agencies provide information on services and facilities accessible to people with disability.


Additional resources

Access for people who are blind or have vision impairment

VisAbility (formerly The Association for the Blind of WA) offers information, advice and support concerning the provision of access for people who are blind or who have vision impairment. The organisation can be contacted for assistance in producing written information in alternative formats such as large print, computer disk, audio cassette or Braille, as well as advice on making your website accessible and presenting a seminar to people with vision impairment.

Colour contrast

Having effective colour contrast is important to accessible information. To check whether material has a significant colour contrast, please use the Colour Contrast Analyser by Vision Australia.

Resources for people who are deaf or have hearing impairment

Information about the provision of assistive listening devices is included in the Building Code of Australia, Australian Standards and the Australian Human Rights Commission Advisory Notes on Access to Premises.

Auslan interpreters

Australian Sign Language (Auslan) interpreters can be booked through the WA Deaf Society Inc.

TTY

A telephone typewriter (TTY) is a keyboard that plugs into a standard phone outlet to enable people who are deaf to send and receive messages to and from other people or organisations who also have a TTY or through the National Relay Service. The conversation appears on a small display. To find out more, or to purchase or hire a TTY, contact the WA Deaf Society Inc.

National Relay Service

The National Relay Service is an Australian Government initiative funded by a levy on eligible telecommunication carriers. The 24-hour service relays messages from an ordinary telephone, TTY or internet relay to a person who is deaf or has a hearing impairment or a speech and communication impairment.

Audio loops for hire

Better Hearing Australia provides information and advice about assistive listening devices, has audio loops for hire and distributes Better Hearing Kits provide information about communicating with people with hearing impairments.

Audio loops for purchase

An audio loop consists of an amplifier and long cable that transmits sound from a public address system directly to the hearing aids of people who are positioned inside the loop cable.

To purchase an audio loop in WA, contact Listening Solutions on 6364 4805 or email sales@waelect.com.au

Captioning

Captions are useful for people who are deaf or who have a hearing impairment. Captions show the soundtrack of a television or video program as text on the screen. A range of captioning service providers can be contacted, including Red Bee Media.

Products

Information on technology and devices that enable independence for people who are deaf, along with a wide range of informative books, videos and CD-ROMs, are available from the WA Deaf Society Inc.

Deaf Australia Inc

Deaf Australia Inc is the national peak organisation for deaf people in Australia. It advocates for the rights of people who are deaf and have produced many related policies and papers.

Designing accessible websites

To assist web designers in creating websites that are accessible to a wide audience, including people with disability, the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) has developed internationally recognised Web Content Accessibility Guidelines. The guidelines are endorsed by the Australian Human Rights Commission (AHRC).

World Wide Web Access: Disability Discrimination Act Advisory Notes have been prepared by the AHRC to assist web designers make their sites accessible to all internet users and avoid disability discrimination.

The WA Government has established Guidelines for State Government websites. The guidelines address common policy issues and practical challenges that agencies face when providing services online, including web accessibility.

Government guidelines

Local government information

The Department of Local Government has developed the Accessible Information: Policy and Guidelines for Local Government to help local governments provide their information so it is as accessible as possible to people with disability. Please note that while the information is still relevant, the prices quoted may have changed.

State government information

State Government Access Guidelines for Information, Services and Facilities helps state government agencies provide information on services and facilities that are accessible to people with disability.

State government agencies have a social and legislative responsibility to ensure their services can be accessed by all of their customers in accordance with the Premier's Circular 2003/08.

State government websites

The Guidelines for state government websites address common policy issues and practical challenges that agencies face when providing services online, including web accessibility. Government agencies have a responsibility to provide websites that cater for all sections of the community, in accordance with the Premier's Circular 2009/02

Outcome 4

People with disability receive the same level and quality of service from the staff of a public authority as other people receive from the staff of that public authority.

Main resources

The Disability Access and Inclusion Plan Training Package can be used by public authorities for disability awareness training within their organisation. The training package consists of seven different sections:

PDF documents (also available in Word below)

  1. Introduction
  2. About disability
  3. Legislation
  4. Disability Access and Inclusion Plan
  5. Customer service
  6. Access and inclusion
  7. Additional information


Word versions

  1. Introduction 
  2. About disability 
  3. Legislation 
  4. Disability Access and Inclusion Plan 
  5. Customer service 
  6. Access and inclusion 
  7. Additional information

 


You can increase awareness and understanding by inviting a guest speaker to talk to staff about disability. Discussing access barriers, and making staff aware of your accessible facilities such as toilets and easy-access parking bays, is another way to help respond effectively to the needs of customers with disability. Further information is available in staff training in disability awareness and using appropriate communication and etiquette.

Outcome 5

People with disability have the same opportunities as other people to make complaints to a public authority.

Access complaints and legislation

Good access and inclusion benefits everyone in the community. But despite significant improvements in this area, people with disability and their families still experience access barriers in many areas of community life.

People with disability have the same rights as the rest of the community to access services, facilities and information. These rights are protected in legislation and failure to provide the same levels of access or opportunities could be viewed as discrimination.

Access complaints

If someone has a complaint about access or believes they have been discriminated against because of their disability, there are a number of steps which can be taken towards resolving these issues. It is important that people have their say as this may also benefit others experiencing a similar difficulty.

Main resources

Your Rights is a fact sheet that provides a step-by-step guide to making a complaint about access and lists agencies that can assist with advocacy and information about making a complaint.

Legislation

In Australia, there is significant legislation on access that makes it unlawful to discriminate on the grounds of disability.

Legislation on Access provides the three significant pieces of legislation that are relevant to access for people with disability.

Information on other legislation and codes which support the rights for all Australians to access public services and facilities can be found under Outcome 2 Access to Buildings and Facilities.

Outcome 6

People with disability have the same opportunities as other people to participate in any public consultation by a public authority.

People with disability can find they are prevented from accessing grievance mechanisms or from having input into the decision-making, consultation and quality assurance processes available to the community. This may be due to barriers imposed by the location of the consultation or presentation of information.

Main resources

  • The Access and Inclusion Resource Kit provides information about the nature and effect of disability and a checklist for identifying access barriers to participation in:
  1. public consultations including public meetings, workshops and surveys
  2. decision-making processes including state and local government elections, council meetings and advisory councils or bodies
  3. grievance mechanisms including customer complaints and appeal mechanisms
  4. quality assurance processes including customer feedback and customer service councils.
  • State Government Access Guidelines for Information, Services and Facilities provides information to help state government agencies provide services and facilities accessible to people with disability.
  • The Commission has developed a Consultation Policy to guide staff engaged in consultation strategies. The policy provides a framework, principles and essential elements for consultation.


Additional resources

  • State government agencies have a social and legislative responsibility to ensure their services can be accessed by all of their customers in accordance with the Premier's Circular 2003/08.

 

Outcome 7

People with disability have the same opportunities as other people to obtain and maintain employment with a public authority.

Employing people with disability

‘A culture of inclusion in your workplace leaves your organisation well placed to respond innovatively to the demand of Australia’s diverse market.’

There are many ways the business community can welcome people with disability and experience the benefits. According to the UK Employers’ forum on disability, employers who are inclusive in the way they recruit staff have access to a wider talent pool. Businesses can take advantage of the inclusion of people with disability as a new market by improving customer service and considering the needs of their consumers, including people with disability, in their business planning and development.

If you’re a business person who’s looking to access new markets or to employ people with disability, you will find information in this section.

How to recruit people with disability

You can increase the likelihood of people with disability applying for positions within your organisation by advertising in formats accessible to everyone.

  • The Australian Human Rights Commission has best practice guidelines on recruitment and selection to help you implement a consistent method of recruitment and encourage applications from the widest possible pool.
  • The Australian Government JobAccess website covers all matters relating to the employment of people with disability. Useful information includes advice and support, employer incentives and rights and responsibilities.

Employment services

Australian Government employment service providers are a national network of community and private organisations dedicated to placing people with disability into employment. Their services are free to employers.

Volunteers

Our society recognises the contribution that people can make to the community through volunteer participation.

Inclusive volunteering is about making volunteering accessible for everyone. Historically, people with disability have been excluded from many community activities including volunteering.

Many people with disability have demonstrated they have many skills and abilities to share and that they can participate and contribute to the community when opportunities are available to them.

Bringing volunteers with disability into your organisation

Volunteering WA is a membership-based organisation that promotes volunteering and provides a range of resources, services and support. Its goal is to ensure the people are aware of and understand the nature and scope of volunteer activity and its contribution to the health and wellbeing of the community, both economically and socially.

Volunteering WA’s Enhancing Access team can help your organisation develop an inclusive environment to support volunteers with disability and ensure positive experiences for both your staff and volunteers.

Related documents


PDF versions (also available in Word below)

State Government Access Guidelines for Information, Services and Facilities
Builders and Developers – Stages for Planning Access
Accessible Information: Policy and Guidelines for Local Government
Your Rights
Legislation on Access

Word versions

State Government Access Guidelines for Information, Services and Facilities
Builders and Developers – Stages for Planning Access
Accessible Information: Policy and Guidelines for Local Government
Your Rights
Legislation on Access